Basic Interior Design Colour Schemes

Basic Interior Design Colour Schemes

Living room

When a professional looks at an empty room, he/ she sees the numerous possibilities, a universe of colours and fabrics that can fill the space, and turn it into a masterpiece, worthy to be placed on a magazine cover Yet, when I decided to redecorate my home, I felt at a loss of ideas, confused by the various styles, colour combinations and etc.

 

If you, just like me, still can’t quite grasp the concept of the basic interior design colour schemes, you will benefit form reading this post. Here, professionals from Home Removals at Melbourne, stopped by, and gave some simple examples to understanding, and using the colour wheel to create décors that can rival those in the flashy magazines.

First of all, you need to know that there are five basic interior design colour schemes that can be used to create an unanimous room decoration. You can take a peak at the simple, and in my view understandable, explanations and the pictures, illustrating them. Hopefully, somewhere along the way, you will find your inspiration.

Monochromatic Colour Scheme

The first, and easiest to grasp basic interior design colour scheme is the monochromatic. It can be used to recreate both extremely dramatic sets or very soothing ones, depending on your goals. It uses shades, hues and tints of the same colour, combining them in diverse fabrics, accessories, wall colours and so on to provide a marvellous end result.

If you are aiming for a dramatic, modernistic outcome, you should consider the warm, yet intricate, hues of orange, yellow and red. In case your heart’s desire is a rather cool, sophisticated interior design, the shades you need are blue, grey, black or green. On the other and, monochromatic colour schemes can, and should, be used for neutral settings as well. Beige, creams, white, and some tints and hues of grey will make for high-end, royal room décor with subtle, elegant style.

Analogous Colour Scheme

Unlike the monochromatic colour scheme, the analogous uses sequent colours on the colour wheel. Applying this method will allow you to create colourful, but still calming and harmonious décor. There is a catch, though. You can’t mix more than five consecutive colours, unless you are purposely aiming for visual confusion or kitschy look.

Usually, sticking with three or four colours from the colour wheel is the safest way to design your room. Once you have had your pick, you should decide which colour you would use as primary, and which will be the undertones and accents. Analogous colour schemes have always been popular, and psychologists believe that they can work miracles for your nerves.

Complementary Colour Scheme

Up until now, we used hues, tints and shades of the same colour or consecutive colours to create an unanimous, uninterrupted design. From this point on, however, things will get a bit more complicated, as the complementary colour scheme relies on the combination of two different colours that are situated opposite on the colour wheel. Nevertheless, when implemented right, it will give a room the quiet and subtle elegance, you have been aiming for.

Once you have the two primary colours, you can “play” with the hues and undertones to expand the colour palette. Moreover, white can always be used to accent on some details in the room, make it more harmonious or simply to class up the place.

Split Complementary Colour Scheme

The split complementary colour scheme is genuinely based on the previous one. The difference is that here, instead of adding whites, you can use shades or tints of other colours to to make it stand out more. To make things more clear, take a look at the pictures bellow. To a room, designed in blue-green, are added reds and oranges to split complement the main colour palette. Have fun experimenting!

Triad Complementary Colour Scheme

The triad complementary colour scheme is also a three-colour scheme. It has a main colour, and uses the two adjacent to the split complementary colours to accent on it. It gives you the opportunity to mix up different hues and undertones of the colours to come up with astonishing results. You can be bold and combine blue, yellow and red in the bedroom, or green, orange and yellow in the living room for a funky, dramatic result.

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